Summer’s Here! But What Will Next School Year Bring?

You made it!  This year more than ever, with all the changes that the Coronavirus has brought, the end of the school year is a big relief.

I remember the excitement of the last day of school – both as a student and as the parent of school-age students.  No more worries about getting to school on time in the mornings and no more homework woes in the afternoon.  It felt so free!

For parents of struggling students, all too familiar with the homework battleground, it’s like a breath of fresh air – and then, like a breath, it’s gone, replaced with worry about not forgetting everything over the summer and what the next school year will bring.

Parents, there is hope. There is great uncertainty about what school will look like next school year as we reorganize life around COVID-19, but our experience at Stowell Learning Centers over the last 35 years has shown us that things can change permanently for struggling students, including those with dyslexia, auditory processing disorders, and learning disabilities.

I was interviewed by Mike Koenigs about why some smart kids struggle with learning or attention and what is possible when the underlying skills at the root of the problem are identified and developed.

Most learning and attention challenges can be dramatically improved or completely corrected by identifying and developing the weak underlying skills and remediating the affected basic academic skills.  We have seen this thousands of times over the last 30 years and the brain research in the last 3 decades has proven that the brain can be retrained.  Our bright but struggling students do not have to hate school or resort to coping strategies to survive it.

 

“Helping smart but struggling students dramatically improve or completely correct their learning and attention challenges by developing the underlying learning skills that are not supporting the learner well enough.”

We serve children and adults with diagnosed or undiagnosed learning and attention challenges including learning disabilities, dyslexia, ADHD, auditory processing disorders, and autism spectrum disorders.

Jill Stowell, M.S.

#1 Best-Selling Author:  At Wit’s End A Parent’s Guide to Ending the Struggle Tears, and Turmoil of Learning Disabilities

Founder and Executive Director – Stowell Learning Centers

 

Recent Posts

Categories

Archives