Stowell Learning Center

You Get an A For Effort but You Need to Try Harder!

12I’m having trouble writing my blog this morning because I’m sitting at Starbucks trying to write and everyone around me is talking about the Kings’ huge win last night. I’m a big Kings fan, so it’s hard to not engage!  For those of you who are not NHL Hockey fans, the Los Angeles Kings are going to the Stanley Cup Finals after three seven-game series!  GO KINGS!!1

The amazing thing about these series has been that every time the Kings were down and seemed to be heading towards a loss or elimination, they managed to pull it together and win.  Sometimes, that extra effort pays off.

But what if trying your best doesn’t seem to pay off – day after day and year after year? Trying harder only works if you actually have the skills to do the job.

Kids with learning challenges may look lazy or unmotivated when they “zone out” during lectures, turn-in incomplete assignments, or repeatedly do poorly on tests, but they may actually be putting in far more effort than their peers.

There are many skills that support efficient learning – skills such as memory; attention; auditory, visual, and language processing; processing speed, motor control, and reasoning.  When one or more of these skills is weak or inefficient, it can cause smart students to struggle in spite of good effort.

Brain research and our experience over the past 30 years show us that these underlying processing/learning skills that are so critical for comfortable learning can be developed and improved.  Once the brain is getting complete and accurate information to think with, the academic challenges can be remediated.

Most struggles with learning can be corrected so that that an “A for Effort” actually pays off!

If you, your child, or someone you know is having to work too hard or too long to “make the grade” or if the effort and the outcome just don’t seem to match, there is hope.

JOIN US for a Parent Information Night to better understand these underlying skills and what can be done to permanently turn things around for struggling learners.  Go to www.learningdisability.com for details.

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